Oklahoma

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Interview with World War II army veteran Albert Jones. Jones discusses being drafted into the army in 1943, joining the 10th Calvary, serving in North Africa and Italy during the war, and building bridges and maintaining supply lines. He also discusses the history of the 10th Calvary and the Buffalo Soldiers and conventions honoring that history.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Four part interview with attorney, activist, and former Missouri state representative Harold Holliday, Sr.

In Part 1, Holliday discusses his family and early life living between Oklahoma and Kansas City, growing up in the then-rural Leeds area, his high school and college experiences, the Lloyd Gaines lawsuit, being drafted at the start of World War II, and his experience as a Black soldier stationed in Mississippi.

In Part 2, he discusses his work history, including stints with the Works Progress Administration and Veterans Administration, finishing Officers Candidate School, being stationed in England and Fort Knox, Kentucky, among other locations, and includes some explicit discussion of relationships with women during the war years. He also shares thoughts on the Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Pearl Harbor, Missouri Congressional representative Richard Bolling, the Pendergast era, efforts to make lynching a federal offense, and numerous contemporary politicians.

In Part 3, he discusses the Nixon administration and Watergate, whether America is susceptible to dictatorship, his thoughts on nationally and locally prominent Black intellectuals and entertainers including Paul Robeson, Lucile Bluford, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., and D. A. Holmes, the difficulties and advancement of Black people, including his family members in academics and public life, considers the legal profession and his work in bringing the Kansas City public accommodations ordinance to the Supreme Court, and choosing to leave elected office.

In Part 4, he considers what changes he might make to his life if he could live it over again and whether he believes himself to be a good man, his hopes for the future, more thoughts on the Pendergast era, as well as memories of Harry Truman and other local politicians. He also shares thoughts on civil rights efforts and the US Constitution.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with civil rights activist and Kansas City Public Schools board member Fletcher Daniels. Daniels discusses his family and early life and education in Muskogee, Oklahoma, being drafted into the army, and moving to Kansas City to work as a postal clerk. He also discusses Kansas City's Black community, his memories of Ruth Kerford and the Community Committee for Social Action, staging demonstrations for integration of downtown department stores, his memories of the protests after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., and his experience in leadership of the local NAACP, and his work with and as part of the KCPS board, including his thoughts on school integration.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with founding member of Freedom Inc. Fred Curls. He discusses his early life, attending Attucks Grade School and Lincoln High, working his way up from a porter job at Myron Green's restaurants, working in an Indian jewelry factory, and shifting to construction work and work at the Lake City munitions plant, as well as racism and discrimination he encountered in those settings. He describes his entry into the real estate business as a realtor and appraiser, the role of redlining and other restrictive real estate covenants and white flight to the suburbs, and the change in community fabric during a time of rapid change. He also describes his experience going back to school to become an appraiser, his role with the Missouri State Highway Commission appraising properties as part of Urban Renewal projects, including the South Midtown Freeway (later Bruce R. Watkins Drive) project.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with June Neal about her life and civilian work for the Army during World War II. She discusses growing up on a farm in Brown County, Kansas, during the Depression, and taking a job with the Army Effects Bureau in Kansas City in 1941, processing personal items for soldiers killed in the war. She also talks about her five brothers surviving their military service, the death of her first husband and life as a widowed young mother during the 1950s and returning to work at the Internal Revenue Service in Kansas City, and about a photograph appearing on the front page of the Kansas City Star of her kissing a serviceman during VJ Day celebrations near 12th and Main. The photograph later appeared in Life magazine, resulting in calls and letters from soldiers.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with Julia Gutierrez about her life She discusses her early life in Texas, Oklahoma, and later Kansas City, her difficulty in getting an education, and going to work in the Fairfax bomber factories as a "Rosie the Riveter" during World War II. She also recalls her brothers serving in World War II and the Korean War, growing up in Armourdale, and meeting her husband, Salvador Gutierrez. She also discusses working raising her family, participating in Boy and Girl Scouts with her children, and her involvement with organizations including the church, Lions Club, and Legal Aid.

Audio icon
Audio Recording