Agricultural laborers

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Interview with Adolf Ridgway. Ridgway, born in 1890, discusses his family and early life in Arkansas, dropping out of school at the age of 6 to help his mother, picking cotton, coming to Kansas City in his late 1920s to work on the Santa Fe Railroad, and his memories of the two world wars and the Great Depression. He also shares his thoughts about past American presidents, the boxer Jack Johnson, leisure time activities, and working at other jobs, including North American Aviation.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with labor union secretary and business manager Augustus Moore. Moore discusses his family and early life in Arkansas and Oklahoma, harvesting cotton and spinach as a young man, moving to Kansas City where he trained in the masonry trade, and becoming a member and later secretary and business manager of the local mason and plaster tender union. He also discusses the masonry trade and the role of the union.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with UMKC chemistry professor Dr. Antonio Sandoval about his life. Born in 1931, he recalls his early childhood on a New Mexico ranch in a Mexican American community, moving to Colorado to be able to attend high school, doing agricultural work, and notes that of his graduating class of 100, he was the only one to go on to earn a PhD. He discusses his mother's hope that he would become a priest but instead majoring in chemistry, enlisting in the army where he worked to support nuclear testing at locations including Los Alamos, going on to earn his PhD from Kansas State University where he almost met his microbiologist wife, and coming to Kansas City where he was on faculty at UMKC and his wife taught at Avila, Rockhurst, and Donnelly colleges. He also discusses his participation in United Mexican American Students (UMAS) and working with his wife in the Catholic church's Marriage Encounter program.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Series of interviews with Kansas City, Kansas residents of Mexican descent about their family backgrounds and early history in the area. Topics discussed include life in Mexico, immigration, the Mexican Revolution, working beet harvests and at meatpacking and railroad jobs in the United States, and life in the Kansas City area, including food, housing, and family life.

Video Recording

Series of interviews with Kansas City, Kansas residents of Mexican descent about daily life and the predominantly Mexican-American neighborhoods of Kansas City in Missouri and Kansas. Topics discussed include railroad, ice house, and packinghouse jobs, family life, cooking, community events and fiestas, Mexican-American baseball teams, small businesses, and encountering segregation and discrimination. Interview subjects also share stories about service in World War II, tension between speaking English and Spanish, and playing in local bands and orchestras.

Video Recording

Interview with IMAGE president and Rockhurst High School teacher Dan Torres about his life and work. Born in 1949, he recounts his early life being raised by supportive grandparents in Las Vegas, New Mexico, working as an agricultural laborer during the summer, and his family's distrust of English-speaking priests. He discusses being expelled from New Mexico Highlands University after a a protest with a Chicano political organization, moving to Kansas City at the age of 20 to study for the priesthood, completing his religious education, and ultimately deciding he was called to be a teacher and not a priest. He went on to work at Westport High School, the Guadalupe Parish Center, and Rockhurst High School, worked in other capacities with young people in the East Bottoms and Westside neighborhoods, and discusses his involvement with IMAGE and other organizations and shares his concerns about Westside development.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with Lydia Rocha Estevez about her life and Kansas City's Westside neighborhood. Born in 1919, she recalls living within a few blocks in the Westside neighborhood for over 50 years, memories of school and social activities from her youth, protesting public swimming pool segregation, the poor condition of Adams School, which served the predominantly Mexican Westside neighborhood, and being punished for speaking Spanish at school. She also discusses working with her father and brother in wheat fields during the Great Depression, working as a B-25 bomber riveter during World War II, moving away from Kansas City with her husband's job in the foreign service, and working at the Kansas City Public Library and Penn Valley Community College after their return to the area. She notes that her son, Richard Estevez, was principal of Douglass School at the time of her interview.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with Jose Cedillo about his life and work for the State of Missouri. He discusses his roots in Jalisco, Mexico; his family's immigration to the border city McAllen, Texas, in 1946; his experience as a young student; his father's work at a vegetable packing house, and his mother's work as wife and mother as well as harvest work. The family moved to Kansas City around 1960, and Cedillo recalls his education and various work experiences, and marrying his wife, an immigrant from another area of Mexico. He also discusses his radio show, on which he played a variety of music from Spanish-speaking cultures,

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with Josefa Parra about her life She recalls her early life in Mexico, her immigration to the United States in 1925, working at beet farms in California and Colorado, and settling in Kansas City. She discusses her history with area churches and community activities, memories of World War II and the 1951 Flood, working as a babysitter and nanny while raising her own family, and varying ability and interest in speaking family with her family, neighbors, and in schools. She shares other stories about her neighbors, her family, and Mexican history.

Audio icon
Audio Recording

Interview with retired newspaper proofreader and typesetter Agustin Rocha about his life. Born in 1912, Rocha recalls his early life in Texas and Illinois, his father's railroad work, moving to Iowa to work beet harvests, his education, and working for the Belmond (Iowa) Independent newspaper setting linotype. He also discusses moving to Kansas City circa 1940, working as a linotype operator as a drafted soldier in World War II, suffering a concussion at D-Day, and returning home to work for the Kansas City Star and Kansas City Kansan. He also shares memories of the 1951 Flood, participating in organizations including the American Legion, and his marriage and family.

Audio icon
Audio Recording